Why are Säker Ascension Harnesses Safe?

The Säker Ascension Harness has been tested through the standards of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) for child seats. A majority of dog harnesses have failed those standards (FMVSS No.213).

CRASH-TESTED HARNESSES

ASCENSION (Small)

- All versions of the Ascension (Core, Extended, Dog Pack) are crash-tested

- Tested in accordance with FMVSS-13 for child seats

-For dogs up to 45lbs.

ASCENSION (M-L)(XL-XXL)

- All versions of the Ascension (Core, Extended, Dog Pack) are crash-tested

- Tested in accordance with FMVSS-13 for child seats

-For dogs up to 75lbs.

366 days - 16 SLED tests - 17 prototypes

That's what it took to develop a dog harness that can actually hold your dog in a crash.

ASCENSION HARNESS

CRASH-TESTS (M-L & XL-XXL)

Is Saker Ascension harness crash-tested?

Yes, the Säker Ascension harnesses have been tested through the most rigorous standards of car safety. It has received a 5-stars results according to the Federal Motor Vehicule Safety Standards No.213

ASCENSION HARNESS

CRASH-TESTS (Small)

man buckling his dog in the car using the saker ascension harness tutorial

ASCENSION HARNESS

HOW TO INSTALL IT IN THE CAR

PEOPLE ARE ASKING

Now you could dismiss the harness for that reason, but that would be the wrong thing to do.

How many harnesses or crates can withstand 1979lbs of tension? That’s the weight of a 75 lbs dog in a 30mph crash.

At the moment, almost no harnesses or crates can do that…

So you’re much better off with a harness that hold 1979lbs of the 3937lbs (your 150lbs dog weight in a 30mph crash). The Ascension would smooth most of the crash before failing vs uncertified harness that smoothes 100-200lbs of the impact... We hope that makes sense!

First, we met Dan. Dan is an expert in crash-tests. He does between 8 to 15 crash-tests daily.  Here's a summary of what he explained: 

Even though the speed is 30mph, the impact we simulate here is much closer to a frontal impact into a brick wall at 65mph...

65 mph?! Yes! here's why:

A. the thing you hit will absorb the impact... It's rare that the car will hit a wall and the wall stays intact and the car stopped right there. The tests we do recreate hitting a brick wall that's a 1000ft thick.

B. The car frame and bumpers are designed to absorb the impact. All the components between the front bumper and the seatbelt attachment will absorb some of the impact. In the test we do, the pressurized cannon is metal-on-metal, with ZERO absorption.